“We don’t have to wait for carnival” to do something amazing says Bristol’s first city poet laureate

This summer Marvin Rees the Mayor of Bristol appointed Miles Chambers as a Poet Laureate, the first in the city’s history. The performance poet and social commentator wrote a poem ‘Bristol, Bristol’ for the Mayor’s swearing in ceremony saying: “we don’t have to wait for carnival every year”- let’s do something amazing together and express the spirit of the city in the here and now.


Image: Fiesta Bombarda Bristol Halloween Carnival


Energy City ‘demonstratorium’ – Frederikhavn, Denmark

“Energy City Frederikshavn has the main responsibility for creating growth in the field of “energy” by creating a ’demonstratorium’ for the testing of sustainable climate and energy technologies in the scale 1:1.” Frederikhavn is a coastal town with a population of 23,295 with a plan to become zero carbon by 2030. The town and district already used 20% renewable energy in 2006. The annual energy demand per person was around 0.025 MWh/p/yr and about 30% energy use is attributed to transport.

The following technologies will be used: solar heating, wind power, using waste heat from the wastewater treatment, geothermal heating and storage, biogas to transport in the natural gas system, methanol to vehicles and electric cars, bio diesel and bio gasoline. The project is led by the local authority and has a secretariat a fund a steering committee and a set of working groups. It employs seven people and has an annual fund of about £330,000/year.

One exemplar project was a new heat pump at the wastewater treatment plant in Frederikshavn that was connected to the collective district heating system. The heat pump uses cheap, surplus electricity from offshore windmills nearby Frederikshavn and heat from the sewage plant to supply heat for a district-heating network in Frederikshavn, corresponding to approx. 400 households. The heat pump is one of the first of its kind in Denmark.


Sydney’s City Scale Transition

Form of Energy Use, Kinesis for the City of Sydney

The City of Sydney has prepared a Decentralised Energy Masterplan towards their aim of becoming 100% zero carbon by 2030.  The plan makes a careful analysis of how energy is currently used in the city and maps land use together with gas and electricity use to identify the most intense areas of carbon emissions. These areas are then zoned for the introduction of low carbon infrastructure. In Sydney this means bringing Trigeneration closer to areas of demand. Rather than generating power remotely using coal Trigeneration generates electricity locally from gas, reducing energy lost in transmission and using the waste heat produced productively for heating or cooling.